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Mount Tabor- Israel Pilgrimage


A very rainy day today
 for the trip up Mount Tabor.
Mount Tabor, rising dome-like from the Plain of Jezreel, is the mountain where some Christian tradition place the Transfiguration of Jesus.
Mount Tabor with Franciscan monastery on top (Seetheholyland.net)
Mount Tabor with Franciscan monastery on top (Seetheholyland.net)
Scholars disagree on whether Mount Tabor was the scene of that event (described in Matthew 17:1-9; Mark 9: 2-8 and Luke 9:28-36). Some scholars say Mount Hermon would be more likely.
Mount Tabor stands some 420 metres above the plain in lower Galilee, 7km east of Nazareth. It held a strategic position at the junction of trade routes. Many battles have been fought at its foot.
In the Old Testament, Mount Tabor is described as a sacred mountain and a place for worship. It is not mentioned by name in the New Testament.

The Gospel accounts of the Transfiguration — a momentous event in which Peter, James and John were introduced to the divine incarnation of Christ, the God-Man — do not specify the place. They simply say it was a “high mountain” in Galilee.
Christian tradition in the early centuries named the mountain as Tabor. This location is cited in early apocryphal writings and was accepted by the Syriac and Byzantine churches.

                                                                                                                                   JRD photo
The Church of the Transfiguration is a Franciscan Church 
and part of a monastery complex. 
The architect was Antonio Barluzzi.
 It was built on the ruins of an ancient (4th-6th century) Byzantine church 
and a 12th century church of the Crusader Kingdom.


                                                                                                                                          JRD photo
                                                                                                                                    JRD photo
The scene depicting Moses and Elijah 
with Jesus and Peter, James and John.

 Beautiful carvings in the stone.
This sanctuary was consecrated in June 1924.
An impressive door welcomes guests.
This mountain is also the scene 
for the story of Barak and Deborah in Judges 4.
A very winding road leads up to the church
 and tour buses don't come up this way.
 A series of mini-vans bring travelers up
 if they are not in a car. 
Worth the trip for the view,
 if you have plenty of time in your day.

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